At a recent CERTUS networking event, a member said “I don’t like getting referrals.” The group was taken aback to hear her utter these words. After all, among other things, referrals are what we expect from all the great networking we’re doing.

 

She went on to explain what she meant. She didn’t like it when someone would tell their friend to “Call Susie. She can do that for you,” and they’d give Susie’s phone number. Well guess what would happen? The contact didn’t call Susie. They may have lost her phone number, gotten too busy or otherwise distracted. This is a legitimate drawback to referring this way.

So what’s the most effective way to give a referral and introduce two people to one another? By email. Whether two parties could be good resources for one another, potential client and vendor, or simply share a common interest, I’ve found it most effective to connect two (or more) contacts with an email introduction.

Here are the elements of your email introduction:

1) The name of both parties you’re introducing
2) A brief, one-sentence summary about each person
3) The reason for the introduction
4) Phone number and website (optional)

Example:

“Jenny and Robert…
I wanted to introduce you to one another. Jenny just started in real estate with Denver’s Best Real Estate and mentioned she was looking to partner with excellent mortgage brokers in the area.

 

Robert works at Denver’s Best Mortgage Company is one of the best mortgage brokers I know. He did my mortgage and has worked with many of my colleagues as well and always gets rave reviews.

 

I believe you’d enjoy getting to know one another, working together and you’re both have offices in south Denver.

 

I’ll let you both connect from here. Let me know if there’s anything further I can do to facilitate this connection.“

It’s as simple as that!

Each has the other’s email address, a little background and understand why you’re introducing them. You can take it a step further and provide the phone number and website of each party.
What makes the email introduction so effective is either party now has permission to reach out. Additionally, in most cases, when they reply to your email, they’ll copy you so you know the introduction progressed.

It’s a little extra work on your part to send the email but it’s truly the most effective way to facilitate an introduction between two parties you feel should know one another.

What do you think? Would this work for you?

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Sabrina Risley

Sabrina Risley is a master connector. She’s been hosting live networking events since 2004 and has welcomed 20,000+ professionals to those events. She shares her observations, insights and tips of how the top 2% of effective and magnetic networkers build their businesses. She also shares what NOT to do when networking. Get her complimentary e-book: Strategic Networking for Success.
Sabrina Risley